social media

College Social Media Habits That Help (Not Hinder) Your College Experience

How Does Social Media Affect College Students?

The use of social media in the daily life of college students has gained more and more prevalence over the past decade. Not only does social media usage constitute a large portion of a college student’s free time, but they also hold an interesting dynamic within the academic and employment spheres. As a current or prospective college student, it’s important to consider the ways that social media can benefit you in college. But, adversely, you should be mindful of the negative habits, impacts, and consequences social media may have toward your college experience that you want to avoid.

What Social Media Do College Students Use the Most?

According to recent surveys conducted by Business Insider and EAB, it was found that the most popular social media sites among the Gen Z population, based on daily and total usage (in order), were Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and TikTok. Here are the percentages of respondents that claimed they check each social media network on a daily basis and the total usage numbers:

  1. Instagram
    1. 65% check on a daily basis 
    2. 82.5% use Instagram (10% increase from 2017 to 2019)
  2.  YouTube 
    1. 62% check on a daily basis 
    2. 81% use YouTube
  3. Snapchat 
    1. 51% check on a daily basis 
    2. 78% use Snapchat
  4. Facebook
    1. 34% check on a daily basis 
    2. 50% use Facebook (17% decrease from 2017 to 2019)
  5. Twitter: 
    1. 23% check on a daily basis 
    2. 43% use Twitter
  6. Pinterest: 
    1. 14% check on a daily basis 
    2. 36% use Pinterest
  7. TikTok: 
    1. 11% check on a daily basis 

Based on expert insights, an upwards of 98% of college-aged students use some form of social media. Not only this, but an annual nationwide survey of college students by UCLA found that 27.2% of college students spend more than six hours on social media per week. In turn, this has also led to the time spent physically socializing with friends among college students to lower and lower recorded averages over recent years.

Do Colleges Look at Your Social Media Accounts?

The simple answer: yes, many college admissions departments look at prospective students’ social media accounts prior to making a decision on their acceptance into the school. While it is rare that you’ll be denied admission to a college for social media posts, a survey administered by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers found that 11% of respondents said they denied admission based on social media content and another 7% rescinded offers based on social media content. In total, around 25% of admissions professionals admit that they check applicants’ social media profiles. Even though these percentages may vary by school admission rates and criteria, this provides more proof that you should be mindful of what you post on social media accounts in order to ensure that you optimize your likelihood of being admitted into college.

Will Social Media Hurt Your College and Career Goals?

It’s important to consider how your time on social media influences your daily life, but you should also think about how the content that you post will impact your future. According to a 2017 study, 70% of employers use social media to screen job candidates before hiring them. Additionally, 54% of employers reported that they’ve found content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate. Here are some of the top reasons that employers decided to not hire a candidate due to content on social media: 

  • 39% – Candidate posted provocative or inappropriate photographs, videos, or information.
  • 38% – Candidate posted information about them drinking or using drugs.
  • 32% – Candidate made discriminatory comments.
  • 30% – Candidate bad-mouthed their previous company or fellow employee.
  • 27% – Candidate lied about qualifications.

With that being said, we must reiterate the importance of monitoring the types of content that you post on social media. As a general rule-of-thumb, if a post you’re going to make on social media seems to be even slightly questionable upon review, it’s probably best not to post it. Not only can the things that you post influence personal relationships, but they also play a prominent role within the college admissions and hiring processes. You wouldn’t want one frivolous post to determine your future, so be safe and smart when using social media.

Social Media Safety / Admissions Social Media Strategy

The safest way to be present in the world of social media without potentially sabotaging future opportunities is to only make information that you are comfortable with EVERYONE seeing publicly viewable. One easy way to make sure your social media profiles follow these guidelines is to adjust your privacy settings on your accounts. For example, if you’re worried about former Facebook posts that you’ve made in the past, but you don’t want to go through and check each one, you can change your privacy settings to hide their visibility from the public. Here are Instructions for changing your Facebook privacy settings: Facebook Privacy Settings Guide.

Here are privacy settings guides for other popular social media networks as well:

Safe Social Media Sites / Recommended College Social Media Apps

There are many positive effects to social media usage as it pertains to college admissions and future employment opportunities. Social media allows you to connect to people in ways that were never available to older generations and you can use this to your advantage by networking, being involved in constructive communities, and furthering your influence and reputation. Here are some of the social media apps we recommend and how to get the largest benefit out of using them:

  • LinkedIn – LinkedIn is widely considered the most beneficial social media app to college students and it provides many educational and employment related opportunities.
    • Resume Enhancement: LinkedIn allows you to define all your skills and experience, beyond a conventional resume. You can also get referrals from people you know, which will further enhance your credibility. 
    • Networking: LinkedIn allows you to become connected to students, employers, and  other professionals, which can be very helpful in advancing your career. Use connections with these individuals and entities to stay acquainted, in touch, and up to date. You never know what connection could lead to a future opportunity!
    • Job/Internship Searching: Not only does LinkedIn provide a plethora of job and internship listings for you to search from, but many companies use LinkedIn to search for qualified job/internship candidates. Display your skills and experience on LinkedIn to attract the attention of potential employers that are using the platform to scout for talent.
    • Interview Preparation: You can use LinkedIn to perform research on companies that you may be interested in working for. The more you know about a company, the more prepared you can be for an interview.
  • YouTube – This platform can mainly be used as a resource for educational content and tutorial videos. Here are some of the most popular YouTube channels for education and learning:
    • Khan Academy – Provides tutoring in subjects such as math, science, computing, and economics.
    • Crash Course – Teaches a wide range of subjects, like world history, biology, and psychology.
    • Ted Ed – General, wide-ranging, educational content.
    • freeCodeCamp.org – Provides free programming courses.
    • Math and Science – Self explanatory; provides lessons on math and science.
    • There are many more great educational channels out there. Simply search for your subject of interest, along with “lessons/tutoring/education/courses” and you’ll likely be able to find helpful content.
  • Facebook – As long as you follow the guidelines above to safely present yourself on Facebook, it can be a very beneficial platform to use.
    • You can use Facebook to connect with classmates to set up study sessions, work on group projects, and/or ask for assistance and guidance on academic related tasks.
    • Many professors even use Facebook Groups as a way for all of the students in their class to communicate and connect with each other, share information, and complete assignments.
    • There is a fair amount of educational content available on Facebook that can garner you a greater understanding of subjects in your curriculum.
    • Facebook also provides opportunities for networking, albeit at a less professional level than LinkedIn.
  • Twitter – Similar to Facebook, Twitter can be a valuable platform if you’re able to safely and professionally present yourself.
    • You can use Twitter to easily stimulate discussions with new individuals and keep up to date on current topics and trends among educators and employers.

Be sure to connect with us @ecampusdotcom on Twitter, Instagram, & Facebook for more resources, tips, and some great giveaways! And when it’s time for textbooks, eCampus.com has you covered for all your course material needs at savings up to 90%!

Works Cited

  1. Salm, Lauren. “70% Of Employers Are Snooping Candidates’ Social Media Profiles.” CareerBuilder, 15 June 2017, www.careerbuilder.com/advice/social-media-survey-2017.
  2. Green, Dennis. “The Most Popular Social Media Platforms with Gen Z.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 2 July 2019, www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-loves-snapchat-instagram-and-youtube-social-media-2019-6.
  3. Griffin, Riley. “Social Media Is Changing How College Students Deal With Mental Health, For Better Or Worse.” HuffPost, HuffPost, 22 July 2015, www.huffpost.com/entry/social-media-college-mental-health_n_55ae6649e4b08f57d5d28845.
  4. Jaschik, Scott. “Inside Higher Ed.” Prospective Students’ Social Media Preferences Have Changed in Two Years, 23 Sept. 2019, www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2019/09/23/prospective-students-social-media-preferences-have-changed-two-years.
  5. Moody, Josh. “Why Colleges Look at Students’ Social Media.” U.S. News & World Report, U.S. News & World Report, 22 Aug. 2019, www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2019-08-22/why-colleges-look-at-students-social-media-accounts.
  6. Hochman, Allison. “25 Best Educational YouTube Channels for College Students.” University of the People, 19 Jan. 2020, www.uopeople.edu/blog/best-educational-youtube-channels-for-college-students/

Is Social Media Dating the New Way?

In today’s day in age, social media dating is the “new thing” to do. Don’t get me wrong, dating is already complicated enough but I can’t help but think: does online dating really work? There is a certain amount of stigma attached to online dating, like people only using it to hook up or you can’t really find a relationship on it. When did everything change? I miss the elementary school romance of  when a boy teased you, it meant he liked you. Or in middle school, passing notes to boys with yes or no boxes to see if he liked you.

Now its endless mind games, the constant uncertainty and especially the insecurity. We have all these new apps and technology to “put ourselves out there” but I can’t help but think that its more complicated than ever.

Is Social Media Dating the New Way?

Bumble, Tinder, and the Endless Apps

I have to admit, I’m a bit of a skeptic about if these apps really work. Call me old fashion but I don’t fully believe that you can base a connection on scrolling and swiping right on someone else’s pictures. I hate using these apps because we judge potential matches from only 6 pictures and 300 word descriptions. How can we choose someone through that limited amount of information given? I know what people say, its just part of the new generation but with all these apps out there, it can be overwhelming and tiresome. Why have people given up on old fashion way? If it was up to me, I would rather meet my significant other through real life than through virtual technology. I can’t be the only person who still feels like this.

What are your thoughts on social media dating? Comment below and let me know if you think these apps are more helpful or harmful!

Beat the Boredom Photo Contest – Win $500!

At eCampus.com we understand how important it is for college students to save money, which is why we work so hard to get you your textbooks easy, fast and cheap! But we aren’t stupid, we know these books that you’ve got to have are boring. Really, really boring! We are asking you to help us beat the boredom this month by entering our photo contest for a chance to win $500 cash, or be one of seven participants to win a $25 Visa gift card. All you have to do is get creative and take a photo with your eCampus.com box (the one your books come in, or use this printout instead if you don’t have a box) and upload it to our Facebook app!

Beat the Boredom

In Honor of #ThrowbackThursday

If you’ve ever been on Instagram, then you’ve probably heard of  Throwback Thursday (more commonly referred to as #TBT). For those of you that don’t know, please climb out from under your rock and allow me to give you a quick overview.

Every Thursday instagrammers log on and post an “old” picture. This could range from anywhere 15 years ago to your diaper wearing days, or 15 days ago when snapped a picture of your veggie pizza. You can post something silly, something sappy, or something downright sloppy. There are not real guidelines for posting a throwback photo, although some users adhere to self-made do’s and don’ts.

There is no telling how or why Throwback Thursday began, but there is no denying its popularity. If you search hashtags in the Discovery panel on Instagram then you will see that there are more than 75 MILLION photos posted in honor of this unofficial, weekly holiday. TBT has grown so much that you can now find it’s influence across every social site, including Facebook and Twitter. This week we want to celebrate a little differently. Rather than sharing an old photo, we are posting an embarrassing eCampus.com video from our earlier years.

(NOTE: This video was the winning commercial from a college advertising contest and not a product of eCampus.com. To view other videos please visit our YouTube Page.)

How will you be celebrating this #TBT?

 

CWK: Living Where You Are

Interning from home and in the city (New York that is), going to school in New Jersey and California (and Italy) and meeting people from all over the place is hard to keep up with.  The biggest piece of advice I can give anyone split between places: live where you are.

Whether you are returning back to school or studying abroad, focusing on where you are is important.

Personally, I have gotten very good at keeping in touch with people.  Between Facebook, Skype, iChat, cell phones and snail mail, there is no reason not to keep in touch with your closest friends; but problems occur when you get so wrapped up in all of that communication and start neglecting reality.

While studying abroad, I noticed some students staying in their apartments Skyping home instead of going out.  Ensuring your family you are safe and keeping in touch with friends every so often is one thing but missing out on once-in-a-lifetime experiences to sit in front of a screen is another.

A lot of this is caused by not wanting to say goodbye to someone before you leave.  Saying goodbye is hard.  As Rory Gilmore says in episode “The Long Morrow”, “There’s nothing good about a goodbye. It’s a very poorly named ritual.”

Realize when you go off to school or off to study abroad, you aren’t saying goodbye to your friends; you are saying see you later.

Another thing to realize is before going away for a semester, you know what you are leaving behind, but you have no idea exactly what the semester will bring.  Getting excited for the months ahead will get you in the right mindset when you find yourself at school instead of with your friends from home.

When apart from your friends, or someone who is “more than friends”, no matter what you do, you will miss them.  A part of growing up is realizing that no matter where you go, you will be missing someone.  Accepting that fact and enjoying the people you are around and the place you are is important.

Some fear the regret of losing touch, but realizing you aren’t taking advantage of the place you are is just as scary a thought.

The underlying piece of advice to all of this is balance.  There are lots of ways to balance exploring where you are and living in the moment with keeping in touch with friends.

Keep a blog, use social media and chat up or text your friends, but be sure to spend more time in reality than on a keyboard.