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College Social Media Habits That Help (Not Hinder) Your College Experience

How Does Social Media Affect College Students?

The use of social media in the daily life of college students has gained more and more prevalence over the past decade. Not only does social media usage constitute a large portion of a college student’s free time, but they also hold an interesting dynamic within the academic and employment spheres. As a current or prospective college student, it’s important to consider the ways that social media can benefit you in college. But, adversely, you should be mindful of the negative habits, impacts, and consequences social media may have toward your college experience that you want to avoid.

What Social Media Do College Students Use the Most?

According to recent surveys conducted by Business Insider and EAB, it was found that the most popular social media sites among the Gen Z population, based on daily and total usage (in order), were Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and TikTok. Here are the percentages of respondents that claimed they check each social media network on a daily basis and the total usage numbers:

  1. Instagram
    1. 65% check on a daily basis 
    2. 82.5% use Instagram (10% increase from 2017 to 2019)
  2.  YouTube 
    1. 62% check on a daily basis 
    2. 81% use YouTube
  3. Snapchat 
    1. 51% check on a daily basis 
    2. 78% use Snapchat
  4. Facebook
    1. 34% check on a daily basis 
    2. 50% use Facebook (17% decrease from 2017 to 2019)
  5. Twitter: 
    1. 23% check on a daily basis 
    2. 43% use Twitter
  6. Pinterest: 
    1. 14% check on a daily basis 
    2. 36% use Pinterest
  7. TikTok: 
    1. 11% check on a daily basis 

Based on expert insights, an upwards of 98% of college-aged students use some form of social media. Not only this, but an annual nationwide survey of college students by UCLA found that 27.2% of college students spend more than six hours on social media per week. In turn, this has also led to the time spent physically socializing with friends among college students to lower and lower recorded averages over recent years.

Do Colleges Look at Your Social Media Accounts?

The simple answer: yes, many college admissions departments look at prospective students’ social media accounts prior to making a decision on their acceptance into the school. While it is rare that you’ll be denied admission to a college for social media posts, a survey administered by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers found that 11% of respondents said they denied admission based on social media content and another 7% rescinded offers based on social media content. In total, around 25% of admissions professionals admit that they check applicants’ social media profiles. Even though these percentages may vary by school admission rates and criteria, this provides more proof that you should be mindful of what you post on social media accounts in order to ensure that you optimize your likelihood of being admitted into college.

Will Social Media Hurt Your College and Career Goals?

It’s important to consider how your time on social media influences your daily life, but you should also think about how the content that you post will impact your future. According to a 2017 study, 70% of employers use social media to screen job candidates before hiring them. Additionally, 54% of employers reported that they’ve found content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate. Here are some of the top reasons that employers decided to not hire a candidate due to content on social media: 

  • 39% – Candidate posted provocative or inappropriate photographs, videos, or information.
  • 38% – Candidate posted information about them drinking or using drugs.
  • 32% – Candidate made discriminatory comments.
  • 30% – Candidate bad-mouthed their previous company or fellow employee.
  • 27% – Candidate lied about qualifications.

With that being said, we must reiterate the importance of monitoring the types of content that you post on social media. As a general rule-of-thumb, if a post you’re going to make on social media seems to be even slightly questionable upon review, it’s probably best not to post it. Not only can the things that you post influence personal relationships, but they also play a prominent role within the college admissions and hiring processes. You wouldn’t want one frivolous post to determine your future, so be safe and smart when using social media.

Social Media Safety / Admissions Social Media Strategy

The safest way to be present in the world of social media without potentially sabotaging future opportunities is to only make information that you are comfortable with EVERYONE seeing publicly viewable. One easy way to make sure your social media profiles follow these guidelines is to adjust your privacy settings on your accounts. For example, if you’re worried about former Facebook posts that you’ve made in the past, but you don’t want to go through and check each one, you can change your privacy settings to hide their visibility from the public. Here are Instructions for changing your Facebook privacy settings: Facebook Privacy Settings Guide.

Here are privacy settings guides for other popular social media networks as well:

Safe Social Media Sites / Recommended College Social Media Apps

There are many positive effects to social media usage as it pertains to college admissions and future employment opportunities. Social media allows you to connect to people in ways that were never available to older generations and you can use this to your advantage by networking, being involved in constructive communities, and furthering your influence and reputation. Here are some of the social media apps we recommend and how to get the largest benefit out of using them:

  • LinkedIn – LinkedIn is widely considered the most beneficial social media app to college students and it provides many educational and employment related opportunities.
    • Resume Enhancement: LinkedIn allows you to define all your skills and experience, beyond a conventional resume. You can also get referrals from people you know, which will further enhance your credibility. 
    • Networking: LinkedIn allows you to become connected to students, employers, and  other professionals, which can be very helpful in advancing your career. Use connections with these individuals and entities to stay acquainted, in touch, and up to date. You never know what connection could lead to a future opportunity!
    • Job/Internship Searching: Not only does LinkedIn provide a plethora of job and internship listings for you to search from, but many companies use LinkedIn to search for qualified job/internship candidates. Display your skills and experience on LinkedIn to attract the attention of potential employers that are using the platform to scout for talent.
    • Interview Preparation: You can use LinkedIn to perform research on companies that you may be interested in working for. The more you know about a company, the more prepared you can be for an interview.
  • YouTube – This platform can mainly be used as a resource for educational content and tutorial videos. Here are some of the most popular YouTube channels for education and learning:
    • Khan Academy – Provides tutoring in subjects such as math, science, computing, and economics.
    • Crash Course – Teaches a wide range of subjects, like world history, biology, and psychology.
    • Ted Ed – General, wide-ranging, educational content.
    • freeCodeCamp.org – Provides free programming courses.
    • Math and Science – Self explanatory; provides lessons on math and science.
    • There are many more great educational channels out there. Simply search for your subject of interest, along with “lessons/tutoring/education/courses” and you’ll likely be able to find helpful content.
  • Facebook – As long as you follow the guidelines above to safely present yourself on Facebook, it can be a very beneficial platform to use.
    • You can use Facebook to connect with classmates to set up study sessions, work on group projects, and/or ask for assistance and guidance on academic related tasks.
    • Many professors even use Facebook Groups as a way for all of the students in their class to communicate and connect with each other, share information, and complete assignments.
    • There is a fair amount of educational content available on Facebook that can garner you a greater understanding of subjects in your curriculum.
    • Facebook also provides opportunities for networking, albeit at a less professional level than LinkedIn.
  • Twitter – Similar to Facebook, Twitter can be a valuable platform if you’re able to safely and professionally present yourself.
    • You can use Twitter to easily stimulate discussions with new individuals and keep up to date on current topics and trends among educators and employers.

Be sure to connect with us @ecampusdotcom on Twitter, Instagram, & Facebook for more resources, tips, and some great giveaways! And when it’s time for textbooks, eCampus.com has you covered for all your course material needs at savings up to 90%!

Works Cited

  1. Salm, Lauren. “70% Of Employers Are Snooping Candidates’ Social Media Profiles.” CareerBuilder, 15 June 2017, www.careerbuilder.com/advice/social-media-survey-2017.
  2. Green, Dennis. “The Most Popular Social Media Platforms with Gen Z.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 2 July 2019, www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-loves-snapchat-instagram-and-youtube-social-media-2019-6.
  3. Griffin, Riley. “Social Media Is Changing How College Students Deal With Mental Health, For Better Or Worse.” HuffPost, HuffPost, 22 July 2015, www.huffpost.com/entry/social-media-college-mental-health_n_55ae6649e4b08f57d5d28845.
  4. Jaschik, Scott. “Inside Higher Ed.” Prospective Students’ Social Media Preferences Have Changed in Two Years, 23 Sept. 2019, www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2019/09/23/prospective-students-social-media-preferences-have-changed-two-years.
  5. Moody, Josh. “Why Colleges Look at Students’ Social Media.” U.S. News & World Report, U.S. News & World Report, 22 Aug. 2019, www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2019-08-22/why-colleges-look-at-students-social-media-accounts.
  6. Hochman, Allison. “25 Best Educational YouTube Channels for College Students.” University of the People, 19 Jan. 2020, www.uopeople.edu/blog/best-educational-youtube-channels-for-college-students/

Being Professional Online

While you’re interning this summer, you also want to keep in touch with all of your friends online. Your Facebook wall is full of curse words, your Twitter feed is all about partying and you have a ton of posted pictures that are seemingly less than professional. Your boss just friend requested you—not to mention potential employers are constantly looking you up online—so it’s time to clean up your online platforms.

One of the easiest things you can do is control your privacy settings. When friending your boss, it’s important to make sure your profile doesn’t have anything too scandalous. Keep your albums private—if necessary, don’t feel like your employer or colleagues can’t see anything you post, unless you just really want to keep your personal life and work life completely separate. If friends post inappropriate comments on your wall, you can either make your entire wall private or make individual posts private. Even easier, you can talk to your friends about what they post; hopefully, they can clean up their act, at least while you’re actively interning.

Besides privacy, you also need to be conscious of what you are posting. Watch how much personal information you put on your profiles. When tweeting, don’t post every single thing you’re doing every hour of the day. Not only could it lead to unexpected stalkers, but it’s annoying for everyone who follows you. This isn’t necessarily unprofessional, but it makes your profiles overall appear too simple and doesn’t necessarily show off your true self—at least as an employee or intern. Instead, try retweeting posts from your company (not every single one, or even every day) and other places that interest you. Post some interesting articles related to your school major or skills. The more variety you have throughout your online profiles, the easier it will be for employers—current and those seeking you out for interviews—to paint a picture of what you can bring to the company and also how they can cater to your interests.

Finally, and most importantly, to keep a professional Facebook or Twitter, don’t post negative comments about your work. Think or yourself as an ambassador for the company. If you’re posting that you hate your boss, you have an annoying colleague, or that you just hate what you’re doing, you shouldn’t expect to be working there much longer. If you feel the need to vent—about work, personal issues or anything like that—keep it off the Internet. It might be funny, it might lead to a lot of comments on your Facebook wall, but it’s not classy or professional. Besides, a good phone call or in person venting session is always fun.

Overall, just be aware of what you and others are posting on your profiles. It’s not hard to remain professional, it just takes active attention to your accounts. Good luck, interns!

– ToonyToon

Shore of Jerseys Giveaway

Shore of Jerseys GiveawayWe recently revamped our entire college clothing catalog with some pretty awesome NCAA® gear. We have everything from sweatshirts and hats to backpacks and watches for 430 different colleges. To kick-off fan excitement, we will be launching a weekly giveaway on our Facebook page called the Shore of Jerseys. Every week, from now until the Allstate® BCS National Championship Game on January 9th, we are awarding one lucky winner with a replica football jersey and a $50 gift card from Skinit.com. Invite your friends to join the eCampus.com Shore of Jerseys Giveaway for additional chances to win. If you refer a friend and they are selected as a weekly winner, you will also receive a football jersey and $50 gift card!

This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook, Viacom International, MTV Networks, MTV Channel, 495 Productions, Jersey Shore or their Parent Companies or Affiliates. You understand that you are providing your information to eCampus.com and not to Facebook.

 

Fox

I’m reading New Perspectives on Microsoft Office 2010

Social Media 101

Almost everyone in America is active on some sort of social media site these day, whether it’s updating statuses on Facebook, following celebrities on Twitter, or uploading videos on YouTube.

People interact with each other and companies via social media all the time now from everywhere…you can’t escape the world of social media!

In August 2010, Facebook topped Google to become the top online destination. Facebook users, on average, spend about 30 minutes on Facebook per each visit. Americans as a whole spent 41.1 million minutes on Facebook in August 2010 (compared to 39.8 million spent on Google).

Twitter released a statement last month reporting that they now have over 200 million active accounts, pretty impressive for a company that’s only 3 years old! The average number of tweets sent per day is 140 million, but it varies according to big events. For instance, on March 11, the day of the Japan earthquake and tsunami, over 177 million tweets were sent in a single day!

Now for some info on everyone’s favorite viral video site, YouTube. The most popular YouTube video to date, Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” has been played 185.39 million times! The site itself exceeds over 2 billion views a day.

That’s a lot of impressive statistics, and those are just the 3 most popular social media sites! Other sites like Reddit, Digg, Yahoo Buzz, and Fark are gaining popularity as well, but new social networking sites pop up each and every day. So what do you think? Which social networking sites are your favorite? How do YOU use social media?

I’ll leave you with an interesting video on the power of the social media revolution:
love always,

 

Riddler

 

I’m reading International Marketing

(sources: Huffington Post, ViralBlog.com, AllFacebook.com)

Watch out for the Dislike button!

The eCampus blog is dedicated to keeping you informed in all matters of college life and we know that Facebook is a big one. So here’s another Facebook safety tip. According to CNN Tech web spammers have been spreading a fake “dislike” button that has caused issues for many already. Post’s like this one “I just got the Dislike button, so now I can dislike all of your dumb posts lol!!” have been showing up on peoples walls followed by a link that takes you to a fake FB application. The application doesn’t actually allow you to add a dislike button but it does harm your account. It silently spreads the same message to all of your friends leading them into the hoax. The application can also steal your personal information. Facebook seems to have no plan to add a dislike functionality in the near future so be careful when you see anything referring to it. Currently Facebook claims to be trying to block the application but, in case you already downloaded it here’s how to get rid of the application:

  • Open the account menu in the top right of the screen and choose application settings. You should be able to disable the application from there.

 

SeanJohn

I am reading Human Biology