student debt

Student Loans. Can Yours Be Forgiven?


student loans

President Obama included a new repayment program for student loans in his 2016 budget proposal for Congress that will expand the income-based repayment plan put into place last summer.

“Let’s tell another one million students that when they graduate, they will be required to pay only 10 percent of their income on student loans, and all of their debt will be forgiven after 20 years- and forgiven after 10 years if they choose a career in public service, because in the United Stated of America, no one should go broke because they chose to go to college,” said President Obama in his 2010 State of the Union address.

There are 40 million Americans with student loans which adds up to $1.2 trillion in outstanding debt.

Income-based repayment borrowers make payments based on their incomes and can qualify for loan forgiveness. The Education Department plans to make all borrowers eligible for a plan involving “pay as you earn.”

For more information, visit

3 Easy Tips to Becoming Less Broke in College


If you’re like most college students, you will graduate with more debt than you can bare. And now that interest rates are set to double next month (no joke), this reality is only becoming scarier. I would love to tell you that I have some secret tip to keep you from racking up loan debt, but I am still trying to figure that one out. What I can tell you is that it is in your best interest to start budgeting your money early on to avoid any additional, unnecessary financial burdens. But as the saying goes, it’s easier said than done!

student loans

I find it especially hard to save money during summertime. If I have a good night at work (I’m a server), I have no problem spending a bit more than I usually would. Or when I get my paycheck, I feel the need to “treat” myself to something. Needless to say, I like to spend money, and I forget about the saving aspect. However, I will say that living on my own has forced me to start, or at least try to start, budgeting my money. I have to make rent each month, buy groceries and have enough gas in my car to get me to work or to my internships.

Here are three quick tips that I recommend if you’ve never made a budget before:

1. Don’t Lie To Yourself
When you first create a budget it is important to be honest and realistic. If you know you spend a lot of money on food, include that in your budget. Having future goals to cut spending is great, but don’t anticipate those changes in your initial budget or you will be sure to fail and overspend.

2. Every Penny Counts
An iced latte here and a bag of nachos there doesn’t matter, right? WRONG. The little things add up quicker than you realize, and before you know it you’ve spent $50 on Skittles.  If you can hold off on the little things then you’ll have more money to spend on something you’ll get to enjoy for longer than 10 minutes (like a new pair of shoes)!

3. Take Advantage of Rentals
If you’re like me, you hate textbooks. They’re boring, they’re heavy and they’re expensive. The worst part? You have to have them. If you want to save money, and you have no intention of keeping your textbooks, rent them online. Take it from me, has the best selection of new and used textbooks to rent!

I know I still have a long way to go before I’m really good about saving my money, but like I said, I really feel that living on my own has helped me to start budgeting better. Do you have any helpful tips for those that are just starting out?