internships

Big Girl Pants: Out of the Box Internships

When someone’s typing on a laptop, what do you imagine they’re on? Facebook? Tumblr? Twitter? Pinterest?

Although that is the majority, some college students are actually at work, and I don’t just mean typing up a paper or researching for class work. Virtual internships are a thing of the present, and although online colleges seem a bit sketchy, online internships can yield some real resume building experience.

Personally, out of the seven publications I have written for, only two were honest to goodness in-person jobs, and only one was in a typical 9-5 format (although it was really 9-6pm with a half hour lunch break).

Although working in your pajamas seems like a dream come true, and sometimes is, getting dressed and going out in public to work can make a great difference to your motivation and quality of work. I’m not going to lie though, making deadline in my workout clothes while on the deck at my grandmother’s house with iced tea and cookies in hand is a dream come true…

As a journalism major, gaining writing experience online is an option. Education majors might not find as much luck gaining virtual internships, but knowing how to find internships online is key.

Check out the Top 10 Internship Ready Majors provided by Internships.com.

Speaking of that site, five out of the seven writing opportunities I have had were from internships.com. The steps to finding an internship are easy. Make a profile. Upload your resume. Copy and paste your cover letter. Search and apply. Just be sure to tweak your CV for employers aka customize it with their company name and highlight one specific reason why you think you’re cut out for their position. Then it’s all a waiting game.

Gaining experience can be nerve racking, but the more things you apply to, the better your chances of hearing back. Don’t leave any pebble unturned.

One thing I realized the hard way is to be sure to research or read up about the company before applying and accepting.  I knew a bit of what I was getting into with one job I had, but I quickly realized it was not for me. This situation can be prevented if you do your research beforehand.

There are tons of quality websites to find internships and entry-level jobs that are major specific. As a soon-to-be college graduate, I’m reluctant to sharing all of the websites I use as a journalism major (since the field is so tough right now), but as soon as I nail something down for myself I’ll share some specifics!

Good luck and happy hunting.

Being Professional Online

While you’re interning this summer, you also want to keep in touch with all of your friends online. Your Facebook wall is full of curse words, your Twitter feed is all about partying and you have a ton of posted pictures that are seemingly less than professional. Your boss just friend requested you—not to mention potential employers are constantly looking you up online—so it’s time to clean up your online platforms.

One of the easiest things you can do is control your privacy settings. When friending your boss, it’s important to make sure your profile doesn’t have anything too scandalous. Keep your albums private—if necessary, don’t feel like your employer or colleagues can’t see anything you post, unless you just really want to keep your personal life and work life completely separate. If friends post inappropriate comments on your wall, you can either make your entire wall private or make individual posts private. Even easier, you can talk to your friends about what they post; hopefully, they can clean up their act, at least while you’re actively interning.

Besides privacy, you also need to be conscious of what you are posting. Watch how much personal information you put on your profiles. When tweeting, don’t post every single thing you’re doing every hour of the day. Not only could it lead to unexpected stalkers, but it’s annoying for everyone who follows you. This isn’t necessarily unprofessional, but it makes your profiles overall appear too simple and doesn’t necessarily show off your true self—at least as an employee or intern. Instead, try retweeting posts from your company (not every single one, or even every day) and other places that interest you. Post some interesting articles related to your school major or skills. The more variety you have throughout your online profiles, the easier it will be for employers—current and those seeking you out for interviews—to paint a picture of what you can bring to the company and also how they can cater to your interests.

Finally, and most importantly, to keep a professional Facebook or Twitter, don’t post negative comments about your work. Think or yourself as an ambassador for the company. If you’re posting that you hate your boss, you have an annoying colleague, or that you just hate what you’re doing, you shouldn’t expect to be working there much longer. If you feel the need to vent—about work, personal issues or anything like that—keep it off the Internet. It might be funny, it might lead to a lot of comments on your Facebook wall, but it’s not classy or professional. Besides, a good phone call or in person venting session is always fun.

Overall, just be aware of what you and others are posting on your profiles. It’s not hard to remain professional, it just takes active attention to your accounts. Good luck, interns!

- ToonyToon

Summer Budgets for the Frugal Intern

A summer of interning can be expensive, especially when you have to move to a different city. Even worse when you’re unpaid or making hardly anything. Being in a new city can add to the stress of money problems, since you don’t know what’s an expensive store or where the best bargains can be found. But there are ways to easily save your money while learning a lot at your internship—without having to call up your parents to get you some money pronto. By the end of the summer, you’ll be a money saving machine.

The best way to insure saved money is setting up a budget for each week or month, whatever’s necessary. But don’t just set up how much you’ll spend here and there for show—you need to actually stick to it. To make a successful budget, you need to first anticipate the necessities. If you’re in a housing arrangement not already paid for, rent is obviously a first priority (and don’t forget about utilities if those aren’t included). After subtracting rent from the amount of money you can afford to spend, food is priority number two. Think carefully about how much you actually think you’ll need to spend on food. If you want to save money, you should plan on stocking up on groceries to cook for yourself and pack a lunch instead of eating out at every meal. Instead of stopping by Starbucks on the way to work everyday, make yourself some Folgers. Carry a water bottle in your bag for throughout the day. These little things add up to a lot of money left in the bank.

Within this budget, you should plan to have extra money—not spending it all until there’s $0 left. By including some savings, you’ll always have something to fall back on if necessary, and saving your money is a good life practice in general. You do not want to go into debt because you were in the city and just couldn’t resist going into every store and buying a little something. Even if it’s not a shopping spree, every purchase counts toward that budget and could eat into your next meal or subtract from your rent—neither of which will end well for you. Plus, you never know when the unexpected could pop up. What if you get hurt and need to go to the hospital (even with insurance, this can cost you and your parents might not be able to take care of it immediately)? Or it’s late at night and you feel a little freaked out by your surroundings so want to take a cab home to be safe. Having extra for the unplanned for events will make you feel better and more prepared. Besides, having a big 0 staring at you is not going to make you feel good about surviving the rest of the summer on your own, no matter how pretty the new outfit or how awesome the new video game is.

Of course, you also need to think of the wants and needs. Obviously we all want a killer wardrobe and to go to an amazing concert, but we don’t need these things—you need clothes, duh, but not items that come with a $100 price tag. That doesn’t mean you can never splurge a little, but make sure you have room in your budget for it first. Keep your paycheck (if applicable) in mind and think about what you can actually afford to splurge on. If you already ate out several times this week and rent’s coming up, don’t tempt yourself with shopping trips No one said being frugal was easy, but to survive as an intern, sometimes we have to make sacrifices on the more fun aspects of life for a bit.

Saving money can be hard, especially with an itty bitty paycheck, but it can be done. If you’re serious about having money always available in the bank and not spending your summer entirely broke because you can’t stop spending, you need to carefully weigh your purchases. Buy groceries instead of dining out—you’ll save money and you’ll learn a lot of great dishes to prepare. Try not to buy new clothes or video games unless you really have the money to spare or actually need a new dress for a special work event. Don’t let yourself fall into debt because you decided to buy a new TV for your summer apartment. It isn’t worth it, and it’s better to get into good spending habits now so you’re prepared for when you’re alone in the future. Be strong, be smart with your money and try not to stress too much—it is summer after all.

Happy saving!

- ToonyToon

Don’t Get Taken Advantage of as an Intern

In an Anthropology class at California State University last semester, a professor was teaching about power dynamics.  Each student made a list of the people who have power over us.  Then, we made a list of power we have over others.  In every instance where a person has power over us, we have power over them as we are giving them power.  For example, in a classroom, the professor holds power as it is his job to conduct the class, but the students have power as well.  They have power in numbers.  They can get the professor fired if they feel the instructor is being disrespectful, dishonest, unprofessional or what have you.  As we head into internships this summer, paid and unpaid, let us remember the dynamics of power.

Many companies, especially large corporations, have been accused of taking advantage of interns.  Sending students off on coffee runs day after day without any interest in helping them grow in their professional lives is not an unpaid internship; that is an errand boy.  It is true that we all need to start somewhere.  Be sure to know and see the difference between starting at the bottom and getting taken advantage of.  It is up to you to decide whether you are being treated fairly, no one will do this for you.

Some unpaid internships are worth your time and energy if you are honing your skills and learning under experts.  To be sure that you are not wasting your time, be sure to ask your future employer what exactly your responsibilities will be.  Being asked to take lunch orders is a red flag.  Answering phones however, is a task that falls under the “do what you have to do to get started” category.

There are early signs that can indicate if an internship is going to kick start your career or turn you into a barista.  How long does it take for the company to contact you?  If you ask your future boss a question, a month should not go by before you figure an answer.  On the same note, do not expect the world to stop what they are doing to cater to your every beck and call.

A word on payment: do not be fooled by the words “paid internship.”  Paid internship does not necessarily mean well-paid internship.  It is like when you see those sales racks in the mall of things $5 and up.  Theoretically, they can put a $50 tee shirt there and not be lying.  Will you be getting hourly pay, making commission, per article or per whatever it is that you will be producing?  Will you be getting paid as a stipend at the end, receive monthly, bi-weekly, or weekly payments?  These are all important questions to ask when speaking with a future employer.

Sometimes after the internship begins, red flags arise.  Do you constantly feel as though you are being talked down upon?  Do you feel the people you are working with have any interest in helping you?  Don’t get me wrong; the person you are interning for is not a Guru, a teacher, nor a babysitter, but they should show some interest in helping you learn the ropes, especially to start.

If you feel as though you are getting mistreated, your first step toward solving the problem should be taking a deep breath.  Not much good comes from anger.  Talk with someone you trust to figure out if you are being played or need to suck it up and get to work.  Once you have decided that you need to talk with your boss, you then need to choose how to do so.

If your check is late, a polite email is appropriate.  If you feel you are being disrespected or degraded in some way, an eight-page text is not the way to go.  Ask for a meeting with your boss.  Calmly explain your situation.  Be sure to have a plate full of moxie before you sit him or her down as it will be one of those times in your life where you almost pee your pants.  Deep breath, talk calmly but make your point clear.

Let’s try to fix things before we blow them up, although if you come into problem after problem or feel completely disrespected, be sure to do what is best for you.  It is easy to get wrapped up doing what’s best for others, and generally you are ultimately benefitting, but remember that if your not happy yourself, you won’t be able to please anyone else.

-TravelBug

Best Cities for College Grads

The Economic Policy Institute reported in early March that entry-level wages of male and female college graduates have fallen in recent years; no surprise there.  The average hourly wage for graduates aged 23-29 has fallen to $21.68 for men (a whooping 11% decrease in the past ten years) and $18.80 for women, which is a 6.7% decrease.

So where can recent graduates go for jobs?  The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has data showing the unemployment rate dropping from September 2011 to March 2012, but where are those jobs?  Utilizing the articles and databases of the US Bureau of Labor Statistics is a great place to start informing yourself about where the jobs are in your field.

Forbes has released an article naming ten cities to be the Best Cities For New College Grads.  The cities to win the lowest unemployment rate of the ten is tied, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn. and Washington, D.C., including Arlington and Alexandria, Va. at 5.5%.  The latter also has the highest mean wages hourly as of May 2010 at $29.95.  Other cities to make the list are Boston, Seattle, Houston, Baltimore, Dallas, Kansas City, Raleign/Durham, and Austin.

MSNBC released an article in September of 2011, which would add Hartford-New Haven, Cleveland, Denver, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Atlanta, and St. Louis to the list of best metropolitan areas to start out in.

So what are these cities ranked on?  What makes a city great enough to make the cut?  These lists are based on job markets and local economies, but there are many other factors that you should consider.  Is there a metropolitan area that has a growing job market that is within commuting distance to a family’s house?  Living at home is not always ideal, but spending a year or two crashing with Mom and Dad can save you enough money to put a down payment on a place of your own, or at least help you save enough to get you on your feet.

Coed Magazine posted an interesting infographic in the beginning of the year that is worth checking out:

Moving to an area based on statistics without a job prospect can lead to a great adventure, but not always a great career.  Start your job hunt within these areas first before packing up and jumping in.

-TravelBug

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