Part Time Jobs

If you are looking for a summer job idea, here is the place. Only certain jobs will hire college students, and most of them are part time. I have experience at many different types of summer jobs. In this blog, I’ll include my insight and hopefully help spark your interest. Let’s get started.

RETAIL

Retail stores will almost always need seasonal help. The summer season is perfect because while some of their school year employees will be leaving, they will have openings for the summertime. I work at Victoria’s Secret currently and I love it. If you enjoy talking to people and helping them out in whatever way you can, retail is for you. You need to be a generally happy person and personable towards strangers. At my job I enjoy assisting customers and watching them leave knowing that I helped to make their day. If this sounds like something you’d like to do, try applying to various stores in the mall as soon as possible!

RESTAURANTS

I have previously worked in two restaurants. During this time in my life I was too young to serve so I found myself as a hostess. This is another job where you need to be personable. As a host you’ll enjoy discounts on the food! If you like to eat, help people out, and can easily entertain yourself during the slow time, this is the job for you. As a college student you will be old enough to serve food. This is even better. Servers at good restaurants can make a lot of money really fast. Alongside your pay check you’ll walk out with cash every night you work due to your tips. A lot of people that serve really enjoy it, and the money. If this sounds like something you’d like to do, try applying at restaurants in your home town.

WAREHOUSE

A warehouse is where you’ll likely make the most money during the summer. Also it’s probably where you’ll have the least amount of fun. I spent all of last summer in a hot warehouse tagging clothes. Although I didn’t enjoy my job, I made enough to buy my first car all by myself. Warehouses are great for big money fast. Every day I had to be at work by 7am and didn’t leave until 3pm. It’s a very long day. I made 9 bucks an hour though! It’s tedious and long but the money was worth it. If you are a scheduled person and are excited for a lot of hours and money, try applying at a local warehouse, they always need all the help they can get.

To wrap it up, these are the three different jobs I have firsthand experience with. If you’re looking for a summer job but don’t know where to go, try one of these options. The options I listed are usually looking for people this time of year especially. Good luck on your search!

While you’re interning this summer, you also want to keep in touch with all of your friends online. Your Facebook wall is full of curse words, your Twitter feed is all about partying and you have a ton of posted pictures that are seemingly less than professional. Your boss just friend requested you—not to mention potential employers are constantly looking you up online—so it’s time to clean up your online platforms.

One of the easiest things you can do is control your privacy settings. When friending your boss, it’s important to make sure your profile doesn’t have anything too scandalous. Keep your albums private—if necessary, don’t feel like your employer or colleagues can’t see anything you post, unless you just really want to keep your personal life and work life completely separate. If friends post inappropriate comments on your wall, you can either make your entire wall private or make individual posts private. Even easier, you can talk to your friends about what they post; hopefully, they can clean up their act, at least while you’re actively interning.

Besides privacy, you also need to be conscious of what you are posting. Watch how much personal information you put on your profiles. When tweeting, don’t post every single thing you’re doing every hour of the day. Not only could it lead to unexpected stalkers, but it’s annoying for everyone who follows you. This isn’t necessarily unprofessional, but it makes your profiles overall appear too simple and doesn’t necessarily show off your true self—at least as an employee or intern. Instead, try retweeting posts from your company (not every single one, or even every day) and other places that interest you. Post some interesting articles related to your school major or skills. The more variety you have throughout your online profiles, the easier it will be for employers—current and those seeking you out for interviews—to paint a picture of what you can bring to the company and also how they can cater to your interests.

Finally, and most importantly, to keep a professional Facebook or Twitter, don’t post negative comments about your work. Think or yourself as an ambassador for the company. If you’re posting that you hate your boss, you have an annoying colleague, or that you just hate what you’re doing, you shouldn’t expect to be working there much longer. If you feel the need to vent—about work, personal issues or anything like that—keep it off the Internet. It might be funny, it might lead to a lot of comments on your Facebook wall, but it’s not classy or professional. Besides, a good phone call or in person venting session is always fun.

Overall, just be aware of what you and others are posting on your profiles. It’s not hard to remain professional, it just takes active attention to your accounts. Good luck, interns!

- ToonyToon

In an Anthropology class at California State University last semester, a professor was teaching about power dynamics.  Each student made a list of the people who have power over us.  Then, we made a list of power we have over others.  In every instance where a person has power over us, we have power over them as we are giving them power.  For example, in a classroom, the professor holds power as it is his job to conduct the class, but the students have power as well.  They have power in numbers.  They can get the professor fired if they feel the instructor is being disrespectful, dishonest, unprofessional or what have you.  As we head into internships this summer, paid and unpaid, let us remember the dynamics of power.

Many companies, especially large corporations, have been accused of taking advantage of interns.  Sending students off on coffee runs day after day without any interest in helping them grow in their professional lives is not an unpaid internship; that is an errand boy.  It is true that we all need to start somewhere.  Be sure to know and see the difference between starting at the bottom and getting taken advantage of.  It is up to you to decide whether you are being treated fairly, no one will do this for you.

Some unpaid internships are worth your time and energy if you are honing your skills and learning under experts.  To be sure that you are not wasting your time, be sure to ask your future employer what exactly your responsibilities will be.  Being asked to take lunch orders is a red flag.  Answering phones however, is a task that falls under the “do what you have to do to get started” category.

There are early signs that can indicate if an internship is going to kick start your career or turn you into a barista.  How long does it take for the company to contact you?  If you ask your future boss a question, a month should not go by before you figure an answer.  On the same note, do not expect the world to stop what they are doing to cater to your every beck and call.

A word on payment: do not be fooled by the words “paid internship.”  Paid internship does not necessarily mean well-paid internship.  It is like when you see those sales racks in the mall of things $5 and up.  Theoretically, they can put a $50 tee shirt there and not be lying.  Will you be getting hourly pay, making commission, per article or per whatever it is that you will be producing?  Will you be getting paid as a stipend at the end, receive monthly, bi-weekly, or weekly payments?  These are all important questions to ask when speaking with a future employer.

Sometimes after the internship begins, red flags arise.  Do you constantly feel as though you are being talked down upon?  Do you feel the people you are working with have any interest in helping you?  Don’t get me wrong; the person you are interning for is not a Guru, a teacher, nor a babysitter, but they should show some interest in helping you learn the ropes, especially to start.

If you feel as though you are getting mistreated, your first step toward solving the problem should be taking a deep breath.  Not much good comes from anger.  Talk with someone you trust to figure out if you are being played or need to suck it up and get to work.  Once you have decided that you need to talk with your boss, you then need to choose how to do so.

If your check is late, a polite email is appropriate.  If you feel you are being disrespected or degraded in some way, an eight-page text is not the way to go.  Ask for a meeting with your boss.  Calmly explain your situation.  Be sure to have a plate full of moxie before you sit him or her down as it will be one of those times in your life where you almost pee your pants.  Deep breath, talk calmly but make your point clear.

Let’s try to fix things before we blow them up, although if you come into problem after problem or feel completely disrespected, be sure to do what is best for you.  It is easy to get wrapped up doing what’s best for others, and generally you are ultimately benefitting, but remember that if your not happy yourself, you won’t be able to please anyone else.

-TravelBug

Creating a resume is the biggest wake up call of your life. Not only do you have to think of all the responsibilities you had—or didn’t have—at your last internship, but you need to find a way to stand out. Especially when writing a resume for the very first internship you’re applying for and the only work you’ve ever known is a good old fast food restaurant, it might be tempting to embellish or even lie. While you certainly have to sell yourself and prove to the potential employer that you can get the job done and done well, there are lots of tips and tricks to keep in mind when crafting your resume.

Most importantly, you have to tell the truth. Think of yourself as Pinocchio. Sure, embellishing your duties here and there might seem like no biggie. This particular interviewer might not call up your references and ask. That added skill that you don’t really have might not be needed for this job…but what if they do call? What if that skill’s needed? Adding to your resume might help get you an interview—or even the gig—but at the end of the day, it isn’t worth it. Knowing you lied might trip you up during the interview, especially if they call into question what you wrote (not that they’ll think you’re lying necessarily, they just need to know more sometimes). Honesty is really the best policy for jobs.

If you don’t have a lot of experience or feel like a particular internship didn’t give you a lot of responsibilities, don’t sweat it. Resumes should be limited to one page. Honestly, we’re in college—if you have that much more than a page worth of stuff to tell in a resume, I applaud you. Stick to the most relevant experiences you’ve had. Even if it was an award you won in high school or a major accomplishment, it can stay on—though eventually you’ll cut those things off as you grow in experience and more related qualifications. Instead of lying to fill out your one page, you can also discuss classes you’ve taken that are pertinent to the position. If you want to be a web design intern, add on your web design class. But also be weary of tacking on your whole schedule. Be choosy about what you list on your resume, and keep the unrelated or unhelpful off the page if possible.

In addition to being choosy about the positions you include, you have to be choosy about how you sell yourself. Your interviewer wants to get to know you—but in a work-based sense. Meaning keep your life story out of your resume! If you had a life changing trip to another country, great for you. But it doesn’t necessarily have to be on the page (unless you can add “speaks Italian” to your skill set or gained some kind of related experience while abroad). You don’t need to include a head shot, your random hobbies or even your likes about a particular internship. These things can come up in the interview—if they’re worthwhile—and that kind of talk can be saved for in-person.

The resume is all about the basics: who’d you work with, where did you work , when were you working there, what did you do there with a touch of why you’re qualified for the new position you’re interviewing for. For every internship or job you list, make sure to include all those details. Have at least three bullets for each describing—with action verbs, like “Researched this” and “Wrote that”–some, if not all, of your responsibilities. Include a skills section for specialties, like Adobe InDesign or html or any languages you may know. Don’t forget to have a section for your education, not just the school but possibly your GPA, if you’re on the dean’s list or anything that helps you stand out. You can also have an honors and awards section, which may include scholarships, any awards you’ve won, or any mentions of excellence. Every accomplishment, no matter how seemingly trivial, counts and can make the difference between you and another applicant.

At the end of the day, a resume is a sheet of paper. Yes, it is important and yes, you should spend the time and energy to make it look and sound nice and professional. But you in person is worth more than you on paper. So don’t sweat it if you don’t have any awards to your name or your skill set appears limited. Put yourself out there, let your personality shine in your interviews and don’t just let your resume do the talking.

- ToonyToon

After a long semester at school, it’s important to reward yourself! Congratulations! You did it! Class after class, roommate drama after drama, and somehow you made it out alive. It’s almost hard to believe that a whole semester passed. Now it’s summer and you have a few choices. You can either spend the next few months “winding down” and rejuvenating. Or, you take a breather, rest up, and spend your summer working, saving up, or getting ready for the next semester—trust me, it will be here before you know it!

So how do you decide when break time is over? You survived your classes and a break is obviously in order. You need to veg out and watch a little tv, raid the fridge and see your friends. But when should you roll out of bed and get back to business? And how can you make the best of summer, combining the best of both worlds—fun and productivity?

I have a mental checklist to keep my summer moving. It keeps me honest and helps remind me that even though I would love to spend every waking hour sun bathing by the pool, it might not be the most practical thing for me!

I would recommend making a list of the different things you want to accomplish this summer—think of it as a bucket list of sorts. It will help you prioritize and highlight the areas you need to focus on this summer.

You don’t have to follow this list, but here are a few ideas.

Do something for yourself. I call this the “Pool time regime”. My guilty summer pleasure is hanging out at the pool. It gives me a chance to relax, gather my thoughts, and of course, soak up a few rays! (Don’t forget your SPF!) Your summer getaway doesn’t have to involve water, in fact, you don’t have to getaway at all! Just make sure to schedule a little time for yourself so you can regroup and recharge from the semester.

Next, get a job. It can be painting, or mowing the lawn. You can sell lemonade, or ice cream. Be a lifeguard, sell shoes. Whatever it is, just do it. Summer is a great time to relax, but no one needs THAT much time to do nothing. Dust off your resume, put on something nice and go searching. Maybe you want to do an internship, or a co-op. Or maybe you want to stay low-key—I’m not joking, a lemonade stand in the right climate has huge potential! Just make sure you don’t spend all summer trying to perfect a body imprint on your couch. A part time job will give you the freedom to make your own money, stay busy during the day, and if you’re lucky—time off at night to hang out with you friends and family! It doesn’t sound thrilling, I know, but it really shouldn’t be optional. Future employers will look at your resume—if not this summer, then soon. They will ask you about the gaps in employment and you might want to prepare a better answer than, “well I felt like the pool was more fun!”, I wanted to try that, but everyone advised me against it so I’m passing the memo on to you!

Third on your bucket list: Family Time! I don’t know about you, but I miss my family a lot during the year. I decided to go out of state for college. I only go home a few times a year. When summer rolls around I’m thrilled to see my family! It can seem boring going home—You’re in college now, obviously a “real” adult! But don’t take these brief visits for granted. Before you know it you will be a senior in college ready to move out on your own and all you’ll want is a home cooked meal and fresh laundry. It may knock you down a few pegs on the freedom ladder when you go home for summer—yes, now you have to actually let your mom know you won’t be home until 2 A.M.! But, enjoy it while you can.

The last tidbit of advice I have for you to keep your summer feeling great is to work out. Don’t let the hot weather and smaller clothes fool you. You still have to keep moving and stay active if you want to stay in shape. Make sure you are drinking water and getting enough exercise. It will make you happy and keep you feeling good. Summer tends to be a “lazy” season for some college co-eds, don’t let that be you! Play outside, take a walk, jump rope, or swim laps! Staying active will not only benefit your body, but will keep on track for when school starts up again.

Summer will come and go before you know it! Make sure you are keeping busy and doing more than just watching summer reruns. If you stay busy and make the most of your time off, you may surprise yourself with what you can accomplish!

-Ring Queen

I’m reading Prealgebra