Career

How to Take Advantage of Your College’s Resources

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Success and Failure Road Sign with dramatic clouds and sky.

1. Join a career-oriented club or organization.

There are many different clubs and organizations that can help you understand and be involved with a career you want to pursue. These clubs can help you build a resumé and inform you about important things to know about that career. There are organizations for just about any career- journalism, marketing, engineering, etc. If there isn’t one at your school, then create one yourself!

2. Attend career fairs.

Any time there is a career fair at your school, take advantage of the opportunity to talk to professionals that have insight on that career. They can tell you specifics about internships and you can network with people that are actually in that business.

3. Go to a school tutor.

If you are struggling with a certain subject, go toy our school’s learning center and there will be other students able to help you- most of the time FOR FREE. Many campuses have peers or graduate students help others with their writing and other work.

4. Visit a counselor or adviser.

If you need help scheduling your classes, don’t know what to expect from your major, and even just need someone to talk to, visit your academic adviser or counselor. Many schools offer counseling services that are including in your tuition.

Can Your Student Loans be Forgiven?

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2-9 student-loan-repayment

President Obama included a new repayment program for student loans in his 2016 budget proposal for Congress that will expand the income-based repayment plan put into place last summer.

“Let’s tell another one million students that when they graduate, they will be required to pay only 10 percent of their income on student loans, and all of their debt will be forgiven after 20 years- and forgiven after 10 years if they choose a career in public service, because in the United Stated of America, no one should go broke because they chose to go to college,” said President Obama in his 2010 State of the Union address.

There are 40 million Americans with student loans which adds up to $1.2 trillion in outstanding debt.

Income-based repayment borrowers make payments based on their incomes and can qualify for loan forgiveness. The Education Department plans to make all borrowers eligible for a plan involving “pay as you earn.”

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/higher-education/ensuring-that-student-loans-are-affordable.

HOW TO: Search For An Internship!

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1-15 Internship1

 

In order to land that amazingly incredible summer internship, you have to start looking for them. But, where should you start looking? Try these sites you probably visit fairly often anyway:

 

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After you have completed your profile, use the search box to search for internships or companies that you’d like to work for. Search combinations of your area of interest and the term “intern,” because you are searching through job positions. For example, if you are a communications major from L.A., you can search “PR intern” or “Communication intern.” Once you have started your search, there is a sidebar where you can input your location information. Also, be sure you are searching under jobs and not people or organizations.

 

 

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Search for, and start following, accounts that post jobs having to do with your major. These accounts post all sorts of positions from all over- so keep your eye on these. Following these accounts will likely become useful later on (i.e. after college) as well. Search for a combination of your major or area of interest and the word “job(s).” Also make sure to follow your college, school, and career centers’ twitter accounts.  They may have helpful information and internship notifications!

YourSchool.edu

 

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Most universities have websites specifically designed to help students and alumni find internships and jobs. Check out your school’s website again and look for a “Career Center” page or an “Internship Finder” page. Then plug in your major and voila!

 

Other great sites to try are Internships.com and InternMatch.com!

 

Good luck on your internship hunt!

No Plans? No Problem!

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no plans

Internship, travel and plans-less this winter break? Here are some ideas to help you make the most out of your vacation (in a not-binging-Netflix-the-WHOLE-time sort of way!):

Look for summer internships!Or study abroad programs or jobs.
Some applications are just opening up over winter break, so getting a head start on your search now might put you ahead of the game.

Clean up your resume!
This is a project that can take an hour or 4 days. Making your resume stand out (without the pink paper and strawberry scent) can also put you ahead in an internship or job search.

Take a winter class!
Get ahead in your studies and you might be able to graduate early (read: save money).

Get in shape!
If you never have time to hit the gym during the semester, try getting in shape over the break and then trying to stick to your routine when you return to school.

Learn a new skill!
Whether it’s learning to cook, play guitar, ride a bike, computer code, rock climb or speak Spanish, you’ve got free time and skills to learn!

Roadtrip with friends!
Find friends who also have a week or weekend and head someplace new!

And when all else fails?
Binge Netflix!

Considering Your Future Through Each Stage of College

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Freshman Year:

 stage1

 This is your time to explore. Take a variety of general education classes and see if you discover a subject you never thought you’d have an interest in. Your freshman year is a great time to expand your horizons. It’s better to figure out what you really want to do sooner rather than later, so you have enough time to graduate on time if you make any changes to your plans. Sure, you might be coming in to college knowing what you want to do, but you never know. You could take a gen. ed. at the end of your junior year and realize your passions might lie elsewhere. Take advantage of the variety of courses available to you to make sure you know all of your options before you commit to anything.

Sophomore Year:

 stage

Continue exploring, but start narrowing it down. You’re usually expected to declare your major by the end of this year, so you should start to seriously consider your passions so you feel more comfortable committing to a particular field of study and/or career path by the end of your Sophomore spring semester. Figure out if you want to take on a double major or perhaps some minors and certificates. Do your research to see what the requirements are to make sure you have enough time to complete them so you can plan accordingly. Talk to your advisor throughout this process, he/she can be very helpful. This is also a good time to start thinking about the campus organizations that can be useful for your future career once you start to figure out what you want.

Junior Year:

 stage 3

You might be able to get away with waiting until the middle of this year to officially declare your major, but you should be paying close attention to the requirements of the major or majors you are considering. If you want to be able to graduate on time, this is crucial. This is a good time to start applying for internships if you haven’t already. Internships have basically become a necessity for college students hoping to get full time jobs after graduation. You should also be figuring out what your options are for after you graduate: Grad School? Medical School? Law School? Straight into your career? Take a year off to travel? Get a job teaching English abroad? You should look into all the options you’re interested in so you know what you have to do to make it happen. Look at the application process for different programs and/or jobs. Do all the research you can and there will be fewer surprises. You’ll be much more relaxed if you’re prepared.

Senior Year:

 stage 4

At this point, you should be pretty clear about your plan. There’s still some time to make decisions about your post-graduation plans, but don’t put things off for too long or you run the risk of delaying your progress. There are deadlines for a lot of your options and you don’t want to miss them or you might have to wait a year. Make sure you’re keeping up with your current academic requirements so keep in touch with your advisor so you stay on track. Make sure you do everything you need to do for graduation so it will be less stressful. Graduation can be an emotional time so minimizing your stress will make the whole process less overwhelming.